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Lone Star Steakhouse Baked Sweet Potato Recipe
Lone Star Steakhouse Baked Sweet Potato
By Todd Wilbur

Recipe Type: Side Dish
Calories: 112
Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Recipe Rating: 4.5 (11 reviews)
 
Sweet potatoes are not related to the more common russet potatoes and are often confused with yams in the grocery store and on menus (the yam is actually starchier and less flavorful). Just be sure you're buying sweet potatoes when you get to the produce section -- even the produce stockers get mixed up! Although these puppies are not really potatoes, the baking times are the same. And when you spoon on some butter and sprinkle cinnamon/sugar over the top, you've got a treat that tastes more like dessert than a versatile side dish.

Source: "Top Secret Restaurant Recipes 2" by Todd Wilbur.

Photo by Karen Ury.

4 sweet potatoes
vegetable oil
...
        
Just like you're at the restaurant!
Karen Ury  
Submitted on: 02/07/13
I've had this potato numerous times at Lone Star, and this recipe tastes just like it. Great with a thick charred pork chop and some good bread.
K Hinkle  
Submitted on: 10/15/06
I've used this one a hundred times - an always the guests love them!
Bettye VanderVeen  
Submitted on: 02/13/06
I am afraid that you have misdefined sweet potatoes and yams. ABOUT SWEET POTATOES AND YAMS Sweet potatoes and yams are unrelated, although both are roots of a vine. Sweet potatoes are members of the morning glory family, while yams are members of the lily family. Yams can grow up to seven feet long. More than 30 years ago, dark-skinned sweet potatoes with sweet bright-orange flesh were introduced into the U.S. To distinguish them from the more traditional tan-skinned variety of sweet potato with less-sweet light colored flesh, the African word "nyami" referring to an edible root, was adopted in its English form "yam" and given to those dark-skinned sweet potatoes. Common usage has made the term acceptable; however, the U.S. Department of Agriculture requires that the label "yam" always be accompanied by "sweet potato".
Vickie Ca.  
Submitted on: 01/14/06
I have to agree with everyone here these are GREAT!I used foil like cooking a baked potato seemed to cook faster. Also I used (brown sugar) with butter for the topping ingredients and I have to tell they were Yummy! Good comfort food for the winter!! Thanks :)
Bill Preston  
Submitted on: 01/08/06
Instead of sugar I use "agave nectar". You can order this by going to: www.molinoreal.com This is especially good for those having problems with high sugar. This delicious nectar is great used on sweet potatoes to hot cakes.
CHARLOTTE  
Submitted on: 12/28/05
BEING A DIABETIC, I WOULD SUBSTITUTE THE SUGAR FOR SPLENDA. THANKS FOR ANOTHER WAY TO EAT SWEET POTATOES! I LOVE THEM BAKED, WITH JUST PLAIN BUTTER, SO THIS IS A WONDERFUL VARIATION! I HATE THAT SWEET POTATO STUFF BAKED IN SYRUP AND MARSHMALLOWS, THEY ARE WAYYYY TOO HIGH IN SUGAR CONTENT! I THINK I'D MAYBE ADD A TOUCH OF NUTMEG TO IT TOO, AND BLEND THE SPICE MIXTURE INTO THE BUTTER, BUT THEN I AM A NUTMEG NUT TOO! LOL. THANKS FOR THE RECIPE, IT IS GREAT!
DEBONTHEWEB1@VERIZON.NET  
Submitted on: 11/26/05
yes yes yes this is really the best. It was the next best thing as to truly being at the restaurant. A perfect 10........
Deborah L. Madden  
Submitted on: 10/25/05
I think this is great! You have answered a question which has puzzled me for a long time..the difference between a Sweet Potato and a Yam...Thanks for clearing this up for me and for the great secret tip...I have always enjoyed eating these delicious potatoes at Lone Star.
TILLIE SUESSE  
Submitted on: 10/18/05
My husband loves this recipe. We have had the sweet potatoes at Lone Star and could not tell the difference in the ones I made at home.
Crystal  
Submitted on: 10/10/05
If you don't care about the calories, add a dollop of marshmallow fluff (creme) and toast it a little. It's like an individual serving of the popular Thanksgiving sweet potato cassarole. Yum!
Bec  
Submitted on: 09/25/05
i loved this! its such a nice way to have sweet potato, and my entire family really loved it :)